The Rhythm Of Us

The Rhythm Of Us - Written by Meg Crossan @barefoot.farming.family

 

Life with small children is so wonderfully chaotic; busy days, wakeful nights, there’s never 
enough time, and that can feel quite overwhelming as the adult, let alone the child. Three 
years into knowing these beautiful beings I am beginning to understand our family’s needs, 
the way of life we follow keeps us grounded, as loving arms calm unsettled children it holds 
us. It works because it’s ours, but its adaptable to you and your family regardless of your 
circumstances. Use this guide to create your own rhythm, reduce the emotional labour you 
carry and gift your children a sense of knowledge and calm. 

 

The Daily Heartbeat 

I like to think of our rhythm as our heartbeat, a constant reliability, never centre stage but 
always there, guiding us, grounding us. Its flexible, speeds up when wanted, slows when 
needed. 
 
Rise 
Breakfast & journal 
Morning movement 
Errands 
Lunch 
Afternoon rest 
Outdoor time 
Teatime  
Indoor time 
Evening meal 
Meditation and bedtime

 

Rise – naturally if possible but you may need alarms dependent on your lifestyle, if so try to  

factor in your natural 90-minute sleep cycle to wake when your body is most ready. 

Breakfast & journal/ colour – a gentle start to the day, in time colouring on scrap paper will  

hopefully transition into journaling. A practice I struggle to commit to but one that calms my  

mind. We eat porridge and toast in the winter, berries, yogurt and fruit in the summer. 

Morning movement – Yoga or Qui Gong, in the garden if possible, sometimes we follow a  

Youtube video for ease.  

Errands or outings – Depending on the seasons these vary in frequency and intensity. Now  

that Winter is approaching, they are less frequent and we plan more home days in. If we’ve  

had a big outing or a long social engagement one day, the next day will be spent at home or  

running low level errands only. If we’ve seen friends in the morning, we’ll keep the  

afternoon free to balance it out. In the height of summer this is less needed and we might  

be out for several days in a row enjoying the long days and warm evenings that the season  

lends us. 

 

Lunch – simple and similar is key. Soup, bread and cheese in winter, salads and sandwiches  

in summer. Eating these sorts of foods each day may sound dull but we vary it so much 

dependent on what’s abundant. 

The familiarity of eating this way feels secure, removes the  mental load of providing endless

 food options and still allows us to eat an ethical and varied  

diet. 

 Flaww blog post - family life lunch in the garden

Afternoon rest – our energy lulls in the early afternoon, so we’ve chosen not to fight that.  

We follow our bodies signals when we can, if we are able to, we rest. It’s not always  

possible, but we can usually find a small period of time to slow the rhythm, even if it’s taking  

the scenic route on an errand or listening to a guided meditation while we tidy up. There are  

ways to make it work even when you can’t go to bed for an hour. 

 flaww blog post toddler sleeping nap time

Outdoor time – this is so important, every single day if you can, even if it’s half an hour in  

waterproofs and lots of layers, a walk or some time doing outdoor jobs is so therapeutic for  

every member of the family. Our outdoor time sees us playing, resting, working and  

creating.  Whatever it is, it doesn’t matter, grounding into the earth is what’s important. I’ve  

seen my children’s happiness grow without limit since we said goodbye to our conventional  

house in town and moved; first off-grid and then to a dilapidated cottage in a small sleepy  

village. Regardless of our living arrangements we’ve held onto our need for the outdoors. If  

you’re new to an outdoor focused rhythm there are many resources to guide you on how to  

build outdoor time into your day, such as: “1000 hours outside”, and curriculums like  

“Exploring Nature with Children.” 

 flaww blog post kids outdoor activities

Teatime – This is a fairly new addition but we’ve started having tea together mid-afternoon.  

Previously I’d make everyone a snack when they came inside and they’d go off and find  

something to do straight away, now when we come inside, I make a pot of tea and we sit for  

a few minutes to eat and drink together, I might read them a book, poem or look through  

the treasures they have bought inside read: sticks and leaves. I really love this little  

reconnect time, it’s 15 minutes at most but it really lets me into their world and is a great  

way to transition to indoor time more easily – especially for children who struggle to change  

tasks. 

 flaww blog post family time

Indoor time – this is to facilitate cooking our evening meal, warming up and winding down.  

In Winter this is earlier than in Summer. We share the responsibility of cooking, often the  

children will peel and chop vegetables, knead dough, stir and mix ingredients. On Fridays  

they cook as much of the meal as possible.  

 flaww blog post kids cooking dinner

Evening meal – we eat this together, generally at the table, but we don’t insist the children  

stay seated, it puts too much pressure on everyone. The children come and go, eating and  

chatting to us. By the evening they are tired and fractious so we don’t feel it’s in their best  

interests to put significant limits on this time. 

Bedtime – a few nights a week we’ll run a bath for whoever wants one, Frank usually  

doesn’t, but will help me bathe Clemmie and may well end up getting in towards the end so  

we don’t push it. Often we’ll do a short meditation before bed, the children are present for  

this but aren’t able to practice it yet, they enjoy these few minutes of quiet play while we  

meditate, and it aligns our calming energies before bed. Bedtime is a family affair, again  

co-sleeping works for us, our children gain comfort from falling asleep next to us. We get  

back up once they are asleep, tidy up and spend some time together before going back to  

bed later on. 

  

This outline is very simple, it probably looks a lot like your day, but I find writing it out and 
having it to refer back to, when tensions are high or we’re getting overwhelmed, helps to 
regulate our energy, gives a structure to realign with regardless of the time of day. Just by 
releasing me from the decision of what to do next is often enough to settle my thoughts and 
nurture me through this journey of motherhood. 

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published